August 2, 2020

A robust RabbitMQ client in Go

A few months ago I started working on a project that heavily relies on RabbitMQ as a message broker. We have two clients communicating with Go, one via AMQP (RabbitMQ) and the other through HTTP. As our dependency on RabbitMQ is big, I had to write a robust client that does graceful shutdowns, panic recoveries, is multithreaded, logs everything nicely, and more. Read more

May 23, 2020

Pushing data upstream in Context

Go’s context is a hefty tool that was added as an official package back in 1.7. The context package provides contextual information that a goroutine may need such as how long it should run and how and when it should end. It can also pass informational key-value pairs for use down the call chain. But what if we need to pass information up in the call chain? Pointers come to the rescue. Read more

February 2, 2020

Updating Goroutines post-creation

One of the greatest things about Go is how it deals with concurrency. It is far simpler compared to other languages. It uses so-called goroutines - a lightweight thread managed by the Go runtime. While they are mostly used for asynchronous, fire-and-forget stuff (most common usage being HTTP multiplexers), I recently needed to have them updated post creation. The obvious first choice in Go would be to use channels, but trying to build the solution with them caused me some issues, which made me opt for a far simpler one - maps. Read more

January 20, 2020

Writing RESTful APIs in Go, 3 years later

I’ve started working with Go in early 2017, and since then most of my work has been writing RESTful APIs with it. With time I gained experience. and I constantly change the way I write APIs in Go. After a year of working with Go, I’ve released Gorsk - a Golang RESTful starter kit, and an update to it 6 months later. I get many emails and questions on how to use it properly, which means that something like Gorsk is highly needed. Over time I’d like to keep it up-to-date with my latest views on how to write REST APIs in Go, and this blog post serves as a first step in the next iteration. Read more

October 10, 2019

dt - Go's missing datetime package

Go’s standard library contains a single date package - time. The type provided by it, Time, contains date, time and location information. More often than not we don’t need location info, or we need to represent date/time only. dt provides exactly that, a time-zone-independent representation of time that follows the rules of the proleptic Gregorian calendar with exactly 24-hour days, 60-minute hours, and 60-second minutes. Read more

October 4, 2019

Working with enums in Go

Enums (short of enumerators), identifiers that behave like constants, are useful parts of many languages. Unfortunately, enums in Go aren’t as useful due to Go’s implementation. The biggest drawback is that they aren’t strictly typed, thus you have to manually validate them. Read more

July 10, 2019

Building a live chat with Go, NATS, Redis and Websockets

Building a live-chat server is a good practice for learning a ‘backend’ programming language. You need to provide an uninterrupted stream of data (think WebSockets), message storer and ideally a pubsub mechanism to send a message to all subscribed consumers. Goch is no different, besides HTTP and REST endpoint it uses WebSockets, Redis, and NATS-streaming to support live-chat messaging. Read how it runs and how you can build your own live-chat in Go. Read more

January 28, 2019

Google Datastore with a relational data model

I’ve been working on a medium-sized European software as service (SaaS) for the last two years. Almost everything we use comes from Google, which includes Cloud Datastore as our primary source of truth. I’m not advocating against it - depending on your use-case it might be a great fit. Instead, I’m presenting the issues we have with it (and other NoSQL/document databases) due to our domain models being very relational. Read more

October 28, 2018

Refactoring Gorsk - Why and how

Refactoring source code should be a constant process in software’s lifecycle. I advocate for 20-25% of time spent on developing software to be used on refactoring exclusively. After working with Gorsk in two projects running now in production (one of them being a large SaaS), I’ve found many things I don’t like about it. During the development of those projects I refactored some things, but I decided the base needs to be updated too. Read more

August 30, 2018

Marshal YAML fields into map[string]string

Recently we moved some of our hard-coded web-app configuration values into a YAML file. Arguing aside (YAML vs TOML vs …), YAML does a great job being easily readable by us - humans. By default, the yaml library marshals maps into map[string]interface{}, requiring a small change to get it marshaled into map[string]string. Read more

August 16, 2018

Twisk - Golang RPC starter kit

Twisk, an acronym for Twirp starter kit, helps you get started with a simple Golang RPC framework with protobuf service definitions - Twirp. It features everything from authorization, implemented CRUD on a single entity, logging, configuration and more. Using minimal dependencies, idiomatic code and best practices, it helps you get started with Golang backend API development - both JSON and Protobuf. Read more

June 10, 2018

Serve SwaggerUI within your Golang application

I’ve previously written an Article on generating OpenAPI (Swagger) spec automatically within Golang. It’s the most popular article on this blog since lots of developers are searching for it. In it, I mentioned that in order to serve the swagger.json with SwaggerUI, a Docker instance is required that will serve SwaggerUI. There is an easier way to implement it, and this article will demonstrate how to do it with net/http, Gin and Echo. Read more

May 26, 2018

Working with Go Web Frameworks - Gin and Echo

Recently I spent a lot of time working with both Gin and Echo. Primarily I wrote an open source restful starter kit named Gorsk (GitHub/Blog post). Besides Gorsk, I’m working on two web apps utilizing Gin/Echo. Even though the reasons for (not) using Golang’s ‘Web frameworks’ are mentioned quite often, I have built my own opinion on these. Read more

April 4, 2018

Automate Chrome with Golang and ChromeDP

Until recently I never knew how simple it could be to automate a task in the browser. A client wanted me to build simple automation script for Chrome - it would log into his Drupal website, open Bootstrap settings and change cdn’s to the one found in config file. Sounded bit hard at the beginning, but after playing an hour with chromedp it became quite trivial. Example repo is available on GitHub. Read more

March 26, 2018

Golang restful starter kit - GORSK

There are many ways to write a (RESTful) backend in Go. Most of the available tutorials are way too simple, with all the presented content fitting into a single file (or at most two-three). More complex examples are quite rare, and even most of them miss lots of things for the sake of reducing complexity. That’s one of the reasons I wrote Gorsk - to have a fully functional example of a RESTful backend (in Golang) utilizing best practices, idiomatic code, and minimal dependencies. Read more

February 16, 2018

Convert txt files to csv with Golang

Recently I found a client that needed to convert a list of txt files into csv - and he wanted the solution to be written in Go. Looking at the source files, I’m assuming the text files are generated by a script or a tool that extracts the data from somewhere. The good thing is that the provided files were very simple, so they are perfect for a tutorial like this. Read more

February 4, 2018

Elasticsearch query examples with Golang

I’ve heard of Elasticsearch quite a while ago but started using around 6-7 months ago. It’s a very fine piece of technology, allowing you to create blazingly fast queries with very complex structure. Comming from a SQL background, I spent quality time reading through the official docs to write even the most basic queries. The purpose of this article is to save you that time and get you straight to work. Read more

January 4, 2018

Create Golang API documentation with SwaggerUI

Having a documentation for you your APIs is more useful than you might be thinking. Even if you don’t expose your APIs publicly, having the docs for your frontend or mobile team is way easier than sending them screenshots/snippets or using a paid product like Postman/Insomnia (premium version with syncing). With SwaggerUI, you can get a well-designed documentation for all your APIs automatically. When moving to Go I had issues setting it up, due to lacking documentation/tutorials, so I decided to write one. Read more

December 15, 2017

Fixing corrupt archive in Golang

Recently I had an issue sending JSON via API to our analytics tool. After few days of troubleshooting, I realized what was the problem during the weekend when the file being uploaded was of lower size due to less amount of data during weekends. Obviously, I decided to zip its contents, afterward facing a problem with a corrupted archive. Read more

December 1, 2017

Glice - Golang dependency and license checker

Did you ever want to check licenses of third-party dependencies in your Go project? Me neither. However, if you want to do something like that, I made a simple tool written in Go - glice. By running it in your Go project, it gets project’s dependencies (with a possibility of recursive dependencies), then for third-party ones gets the license from GitHub API. Read more

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